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Guide To Supporting A Friend After A DUI Conviction: Part 2

1/29/2018

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In the last post, we discussed some basic strategies to keep in mind to help a friend cope with their criminal charges or DUI conviction. However, taking the time to look for deeper-seated issues can often help prevent the issue from occurring again. Here's part two of our guide to helping your friend through a DUI conviction.

Start A Dialogue
As time starts to pass, you should take note of your friend's drinking habits. If they seem to be drinking as often or even more often than they did prior to their conviction, it's definitely a red flag. If they seem unable to cope with real life responsibilities after their conviction, it may be time to take more serious actions. You should start by sitting down with your friend and telling them how much you care about their wellbeing. The last thing you want to do is interrogate them or make them feel attacked in any way. Making sure your friend understands that you're coming from a place of love is essential to getting the right message across.

Consider An Intervention
If more time has passed and your friend's drinking habits are still just as serious, it may be time to organize an intervention. This is never an easy task, but when executed correctly, can work wonders in getting your friend the specialized help they inevitably need. The Mayo Clinic provides a detailed list of steps for organizing an intervention; it involves gathering the people who are closest to your friend and writing letters explaining how the subject's alcoholism has directly impacted them. You'll also have to decide on specific consequences should the person not accept the help that is being offered. Whether the person will be cut off physically, emotionally, financially, or otherwise is up to your discretion, but the consequences need to be real and palpable for the subject to take them seriously.

About 90 people died each day in motor vehicle crashes in 2014, and 6,400 people were injured. While not all of these steps may be necessary, you should always support your friend and do all you can to prevent them from repeating the mistakes of their past. For more information about DUI lawyers, contact Rhett Bernstein, the Oregon City DUI lawyers who care about each and every one of their clients.